Hull 1300's

1303 with a gift of 30 shillings, from John Skayl, the Holy Trinity Church began being rebuilt to cater for the rising population.

1306 Elizabeth de Burgh, the wife of Robert Bruce of Scotland was closely confined for two years in the Royal Manor House at Burstwick.

1307 Edward II came to the throne.

1316 A ferry to and from Barton in Lincolnshire, to bring and carry over men, horses, beasts, was established. The charge was, one halfpenny for every single person; a penny for every horseman; and twopence for every cart going across with two horses. This grant to the "Wardens and Burgesses, their heirs and successors for ever," was made at Lincoln on the 28th of August 1316. The ferry went from Hull to New Holland in the early 1800's and from 1831 linked with trains and was owned by  the Manchester, Sheffield, and Lincolnshire Railway Company.

1316 Sir Robert Hastings, Knight, was made Warden of Hull for his courage and valor, as well as some noble and heroic deeds that he had done against the Scots.

1327 Edward III came to the throne.

1331 The office of Custodian or Warden of Hull was abolished, and the government of the borough was confided by royal charter to a Mayor and four Bailiffs, to be chosen annually. William de la Pole became the first Mayor. By that time it had 2 members of Parliament, had its own mint, and was being built into a major port.

1332, In October, on his way to join his army in the north, the King paid a visit to Hull, and was entertained by William de la Pole. Being highly pleased with the excellent fortifications of the place, and the reception he had met with, the monarch knighted his generous host before he took his departure.

1349, Hull suffered from the Black Death, which probably killed about half the population. But it soon recovered. By the late 14th century Hull may have had a population of 3,500. By the standards of the time it was a large and important place. The streets of Hull were paved but no doubt were very dirty, full of animal dung and other refuse.

1365, There was a weigh house where bales of wool could be weighed. The only other substantial industries were brick making and tile making. Outside the walls of Hull were brickyards and tile yards. There were also the same craftsmen who would be found in any town, blacksmiths, carpenters, coopers, bakers, brewers and butchers.

Most tradesmen formed themselves in Guilds, and paid money into a common fund, which would be used to help the families of the tradesmen, in times of sudden death or fluctuating trade. Fishermen were also members of Guilds which helped families when ships and crew were lost.  The craftsmen took on apprentices, who would be trained, so as to maintain the standards of workmanship.

1377, Edward III died of a stroke at Sheen on 21 June and his grandson Richard II came to the throne.

Richard II was only 10 years old and so his father John of Gaunt (third son of Edward III) acted as regent.

During the reign of Richard II, the kingdom was threatened by the French, who with a powerful army, was ready to invade with the Scots as their allies who had taken possession of Berwick.  At this critical time the town of Hull, grateful for the numerous privileges which it had received, raised many soldiers, and fitted up two large ships, well equipped and manned, for his Majesty's service. The fortifications of Hull underwent considerable repairs and the ditches were cleansed, and a strong Castle, for the security of the town and harbor, was erected on the east side of the river Hull.

1382, Richard II (to whom Hull had been indebted for many favors, obtained, doubtless at the solicitation of Michael de la Pole, Earl of Suffolk) revived all the old charters and enlarged the privileges of the town.

1385, Richard II, in consideration of their loyalty, promised the inhabitants of the town, that neither he nor his successors would ever mortmain any lands to their detriment, and that they should have a large common seal, consisting of two parts, the upper part to remain in the custody of the Mayor, and the other part to be deposited in the hands of a clerk appointed by the King or his successors.

By 1398, the Holy Trinity Guild had 250 members and was the biggest in the area.

In 1399, when Bolingbroke, Duke of Lancaster (afterwards King Henry IV.) landed at Ravenspurne (Spurn Head) and was joined by several of the discontented nobles, for the purpose of deposing the King, Hull continued firm in its loyalty to Richard, and when the Mayor (John Tutbury) heard of their approach, he ordered the bridges to be drawn up and the gates to be shut. He ordered the burgesses to stand to arms and when the Duke and his followers appeared before the town, and demanded immediate entrance, the Mayor refused the request, and told the Duke that he had sworn to be true to his Sovereign, Richard II, and faithfully to keep the town for his use He said that he was fully resolved to do his duty, and never to prove false to his oath nor a traitor to his King. On receiving this loyal and resolute answer, the Duke and his associates withdrew, and immediately marched to Doncaster.

Richard II surrendered in Conway Castle and went to the Tower, then later to Pontefract castle where he is believed to have been starved to death. Henry Bolingbroke proclaimed himself king and took the throne as Henry IV. He placed Richard's body in the tomb that he had designed for himself in the Confessor's chapel of Westminster Abbey. The fall of Richard II would lead to the Wars of the Roses.

1399, Henry IV the son of John of Gaunt, took the throne.

Hull 1300's

1303 with a gift of 30 shillings, from John Skayl, the Holy Trinity Church began being rebuilt to cater for the rising population.

1306 Elizabeth de Burgh, the wife of Robert Bruce of Scotland was closely confined for two years in the Royal Manor House at Burstwick.

1307 Edward II came to the throne.

1316 A ferry to and from Barton in Lincolnshire, to bring and carry over men, horses, beasts, was established. The charge was, one halfpenny for every single person; a penny for every horseman; and twopence for every cart going across with two horses. This grant to the "Wardens and Burgesses, their heirs and successors for ever," was made at Lincoln on the 28th of August 1316. The ferry went from Hull to New Holland in the early 1800's and from 1831 linked with trains and was owned by  the Manchester, Sheffield, and Lincolnshire Railway Company.

1316 Sir Robert Hastings, Knight, was made Warden of Hull for his courage and valor, as well as some noble and heroic deeds that he had done against the Scots.

1327 Edward III came to the throne.

1331 The office of Custodian or Warden of Hull was abolished, and the government of the borough was confided by royal charter to a Mayor and four Bailiffs, to be chosen annually. William de la Pole became the first Mayor. By that time it had 2 members of Parliament, had its own mint, and was being built into a major port.

1332, In October, on his way to join his army in the north, the King paid a visit to Hull, and was entertained by William de la Pole. Being highly pleased with the excellent fortifications of the place, and the reception he had met with, the monarch knighted his generous host before he took his departure.

1349, Hull suffered from the Black Death, which probably killed about half the population. But it soon recovered. By the late 14th century Hull may have had a population of 3,500. By the standards of the time it was a large and important place. The streets of Hull were paved but no doubt were very dirty, full of animal dung and other refuse.

1365, There was a weigh house where bales of wool could be weighed. The only other substantial industries were brick making and tile making. Outside the walls of Hull were brickyards and tile yards. There were also the same craftsmen who would be found in any town, blacksmiths, carpenters, coopers, bakers, brewers and butchers.

Most tradesmen formed themselves in Guilds, and paid money into a common fund, which would be used to help the families of the tradesmen, in times of sudden death or fluctuating trade. Fishermen were also members of Guilds which helped families when ships and crew were lost.  The craftsmen took on apprentices, who would be trained, so as to maintain the standards of workmanship.

1377, Edward III died of a stroke at Sheen on 21 June and his grandson Richard II came to the throne.

Richard II was only 10 years old and so his father John of Gaunt (third son of Edward III) acted as regent.

During the reign of Richard II, the kingdom was threatened by the French, who with a powerful army, was ready to invade with the Scots as their allies who had taken possession of Berwick.  At this critical time the town of Hull, grateful for the numerous privileges which it had received, raised many soldiers, and fitted up two large ships, well equipped and manned, for his Majesty's service. The fortifications of Hull underwent considerable repairs and the ditches were cleansed, and a strong Castle, for the security of the town and harbor, was erected on the east side of the river Hull.

1382, Richard II (to whom Hull had been indebted for many favors, obtained, doubtless at the solicitation of Michael de la Pole, Earl of Suffolk) revived all the old charters and enlarged the privileges of the town.

1385, Richard II, in consideration of their loyalty, promised the inhabitants of the town, that neither he nor his successors would ever mortmain any lands to their detriment, and that they should have a large common seal, consisting of two parts, the upper part to remain in the custody of the Mayor, and the other part to be deposited in the hands of a clerk appointed by the King or his successors.

By 1398, the Holy Trinity Guild had 250 members and was the biggest in the area.

In 1399, when Bolingbroke, Duke of Lancaster (afterwards King Henry IV.) landed at Ravenspurne (Spurn Head) and was joined by several of the discontented nobles, for the purpose of deposing the King, Hull continued firm in its loyalty to Richard, and when the Mayor (John Tutbury) heard of their approach, he ordered the bridges to be drawn up and the gates to be shut. He ordered the burgesses to stand to arms and when the Duke and his followers appeared before the town, and demanded immediate entrance, the Mayor refused the request, and told the Duke that he had sworn to be true to his Sovereign, Richard II, and faithfully to keep the town for his use He said that he was fully resolved to do his duty, and never to prove false to his oath nor a traitor to his King. On receiving this loyal and resolute answer, the Duke and his associates withdrew, and immediately marched to Doncaster.

Richard II surrendered in Conway Castle and went to the Tower, then later to Pontefract castle where he is believed to have been starved to death. Henry Bolingbroke proclaimed himself king and took the throne as Henry IV. He placed Richard's body in the tomb that he had designed for himself in the Confessor's chapel of Westminster Abbey. The fall of Richard II would lead to the Wars of the Roses.

1399, Henry IV the son of John of Gaunt, took the throne.